Schooldays.ie - Ireland's Online Resource for Parents & Teachers

Parenting & Education in Ireland

Immunisation schedule for children



Globally and in Ireland, immunisation happens at an early age because young babies are vulnerable to often lethal diseases like whooping cough and measles. These diseases can kill a child or an adult.

Although you are not legally required to get your child vaccinated, bodies such as the HSE strongly recommend that you do, as your child may be at risk and a risk to others. For more information on the vaccines given and your child’s health please go to the National Immunisation Office Website

The schedule that you get your child vaccinated begins at birth up to 13 months (commonly known as BCG) and after through to school age and up to 14 years ( MMR and booster MMR). The vaccinations are done by nurses at the hospital, by your GP and by a public health nurse (schools).

After your initial vaccine at the hospital after birth, you will receive a letter informing you to contact your GP to schedule your BCG appointments.

Immunisation Schedule from birth to 13 months for babies born On or After 1 Oct 2016 (source HSE)

  • Immunisation begins at birth with a BCG tuberculosis vaccine given at hospital.
  • At two months,the child will receive a 6 in 1 vaccination, PCV, MenB Vaccine, Rotarvirus oral vaccine.
  • At four months, another 6 in 1 vaccine, MenB Vaccine, Rotavirus oral vaccine
  • At six months, another 6 in 1 vaccine, PCV, MenC Vaccine.
  • At 12 months, begin MMR vaccination (Measles Mumps, Rubella), Men B Vaccine
  • At 13 months, Hib/MenC, PCV
The above vaccines are provided free through your GP - Download HSE Explanatory Booklet here

Immunisation Schedule from birth to 13 months for babies born BEFORE 1st October 2016 (source HSE)

  • Immunisation begins at birth with a BCG tuberculosis vaccine given at hospital.
  • At two months the child will receive a 6 in 1 vaccinations, PCV.
  • At four months another 6 in 1 vaccine, Men C
  • At six months, another 6 in 1 vaccine. PCV
  • At 12 months, begin MMR vaccination (Measles Mumps, Rubella), PVC
  • At 13 months, Men C, Hib.
The above vaccines are provided free through your GP - Download HSE Explanatory Booklet here

School vaccination program

When your child is aged between 4 and 5 years they will get booster doses of some vaccines to help protect them against diseases including the 4 in 1 booster to protect against diphtheria, polio, tetanus and whooping cough (pertussis); and a second dose of the MMR vaccine to protect against measles, mumps and rubella. These are given by HSE doctor or nurse in primary school to junior infants or by a local GP.

In secondary schools, the following vaccinations are given:

  • At either first year or second year at secondary school level your child will be offered a tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis booster vaccine. Given by HSE doctor or nurse at school or in local HSE clinic.
  • All students in first year of second level schools will be offered a booster dose of the Meningococcal C (MenC) vaccine. The Meningococcal C (MenC) booster vaccine is given to protect teenagers up to and including early adulthood from life threatening meningococcal group C (MenC) infection.
  • Girls in first year (around 12years old) will be offered a HPV vaccine (watch video) to protect against cervical cancer. Two does are given at 0 and 6 months (Girls over 15 years need 3 doses). Given by HSE Doctor or Nurse either in schools or at local HSE clinic. See additional info provided by the HSE here. A Schooldays article regarding the fears around the HPV vaccine and it's adverse affects can be found here, and the response to said concerns by the European Medicines Agency's Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) can be found here.

In Ireland, all the recommended childhood vaccines given in the schools immunisation programme are free. If your child has missed any of these vaccinations there are MMR catch-up vaccinations available in schools at both primary and secondary.

Comments

Clancy Treacy

(23-08-2015 10:04)


In September, 25,000 first year girls will be offered the HPV vaccine as mentioned in this article. Please do some investigations into the reported side effects of this vaccine. This vaccine has been called into review by the European Medical Agency due to the alarmingly high rate of side effects. A support group has been set up to support girls in Ireland who have been seriously effected by this vaccine. The group regret.ie is not Anti Vaccine but we suppoet making an Informed Decision.

Sean brennan

(15-12-2015 12:50)


How can I stop my kids from getting vaccines.

Submit a comment

Please respect the terms of use of our discussion boards. Full terms here .
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. When you submit your comment, you'll be sent a link to confirm it.
Name Email