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Study finds 45 per cent of kids cannot tie shoelaces


Posted by SchoolDays Newshound on 05/03/2012. Study finds 45 per cent of kids cannot tie shoelacesTags: Primary School News

New research has found children aged between five and 13 are more likely to be able to work a DVD player than tie their shoelaces.

A poll conducted by electricity provider npower revealed 45 per cent of school kids cannot do up their own footwear.

However, 67 per cent can load a DVD unaided and 58 per cent know how to access the internet.

The survey also found knowledge about the great outdoors and basic everyday actions is lacking among most youngsters.

Traditional activities appear to have been eclipsed by technology, with 50 per cent of children able to play computer games and use handheld consoles, while more than half cannot climb a tree or build a den.

Survival expert Ray Mears commented: "Simple skills ... can teach you important lessons that can't be learnt without doing them yourself. You learn how to look after yourself and know your strengths."

Mears is known as a leading authority in his field and has appeared on TV shows such as Tracks, World of Survival and The Real Heroes of Telemark.

Written by Donal WalshADNFCR-2163-ID-801309216-ADNFCR


Comments

DebMcMahon

(05/03/2012 13:13)


all the schools insist on velcro runners and shoes.. so parents are probably not buying laced shoes till children are older ...

Sandra Creevey

(05/03/2012 14:54)


Our school doesn't insist on velcro shoes, but its easier for the kids when they have to change shoes a few times a day. Its up to parents at home to teach kids to tie shoelaces. I'm surprised that only 67% know how to load a DVD though ;-)

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