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Computers do not improve school performance, says OECD


Posted by SchoolDays Newshound, on 15/09/2015. Computers do not improve school performance, says OECDTags: Parenting Education And Politics Teachers


A global study has found that computers do not improve pupil learning and investing heavily in technology in schools has not influenced their performance.

A global study by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) called Students, Computers and Learning found that schools with prominent use of computers in the classroom did not fare better in maths, reading and science. In fact, most countries within the study that invested heavily in education related IT equipment ‘did not witness an appreciable improvement in student achievement over the past 10 years.’

The report argued that education providers must ensure that pupils have a basic level of proficiency in reading and mathematics and that ‘this will do more to create equal opportunities in a digital world than solely expanding or subsidising access to high-tech devices and services.’ (OECD)

According to the report:

“In 2012, 96% of 15-year-old students in OECD countries reported having a computer at home, but only 72% reported using one at school. Overall, students who use computers moderately at school tend to have somewhat better learning outcomes than students who use computers rarely. But students who use computers very frequently at school do much worse, even after accounting for social background and student demographics.”

Andreas Schleicher, OECD Director for Education and Skills, believes schools must do more to integrate technology and learning. He said: “Technology is the only way to dramatically expand access to knowledge. To deliver on the promises technology holds, countries need to invest more effectively and ensure that teachers are at the forefront of designing and implementing this change.”

To see the results of the study see here.


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