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Parenting & Education in Ireland

Your rights as a childminder

If you are choosing to become a childminder (which we define as someone who minds kids in the childminder's home) then it is worth understanding the role, what you can expect with working with children in your own home, and the experience with working with parents, before you begin. If you love children and like the idea of working from home then childminding is perfect for you but besides lots of patience and a great sense of humour there are a few other issues you need to be aware of before you consider this role.

What are your rights of a childminder?

As a childminder working from your own home, you are usually categorised as being as self-employed, particularly if you are minding kids for more than one family. In such situations you are not covered by employment legislation. Because you are, in a sense, proposing and negotiating a service to a prospective ‘client’ you should ensure that these terms are set out in an agreement and signed by both you and the parents. You should clearly set the terms and conditions such as hours of work, payment details, expenditure nappies/meals etc holiday pay.

Deciding a price

Because it is your responsibility to negotiate your own agreement, you must ensure you have agreed on such issues like holiday pay, and all extra costs considered prior to commencement. Before you agree to these costs with parents you must make sure you take all expenditure into consideration, such as:

  • What will your operating hours be? What times will you be available?
  • Who provides meals for children?
  • Will you charge for bank holidays, holidays, illness?
  • Will you require notice if the need for your service is discontinued?
  • What child-care equipment will you need? highchair, buggy etc?
  • Increase in household bills: food & light, and insurance (see below)

Check out our discussion threads from parents on prices to charge.

Insurance

Childminders should notify their household insurance company that they are running a childminding service. Failure to inform them could invalidate your insurance. If you are minding a child in rented accommodation you must inform your landlord so he/she can inform his household insurance company. If the child will be a passenger in your car during your service, it is best to inform your motor insurance policy to see if there is an additional charge: they may class this a ‘business use’. For more info please see our article childminders’ motor insurance.


Return to the Childminder's Forum
Visit our Childcare Section

Comments

Lily Jones

(14/11/2017 23:26)


Just wondering regarding what to charge for a two year old child from 8.30 to 6 three days a week and 8.30 till 230 two day then sister comes in on the three days leave my home for school and arrives back I at 230 till six so what should I charge to include meals snacks etc
What do you do about bank holidays or holidays etc

minderofchild

(15/11/2017 16:53)


Rate depends on what your offering... Are you registered, insured, any qualifications, experience, first aid, garda vetted etc. Where you are in the country also is a huge factor. Are you any of the above?

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